Common Child Labor Laws

Throughout the United States there are a number of common laws that regulate how old certain employees must be in order to perform certain tasks. Child labor laws exist to protect the rights and well-being of individuals under the age of 18 in relation to employment. By knowing what common child labor laws apply to your business and your employees, you are better able to take steps to protect your workers and your business interests.  LaborLaw has some nice tips on this.

Each state has the ability to set up specific laws for the regulation of child labor. However, the state of Texas has a number of laws that can be used as a general indicator for what laws on the employment of minors can cover and dictate. Some of the most common Texas laws on child labor cover how old employees and child workers must be in order to perform various duties. These include the following:

-With few exceptions, children under the age of 14 can only be hired for work in theatrical productions, radio shows, television programs, or other acting jobs.
-Children may work in the delivery of newspapers directly to consumers as long as they are above the age of 10.
-Children 16 and over may work in the sale of newspapers.
-Children of varying ages have a right to participate in work study programs that have been approved by the state.
-A child may be employed by a business that is owned partially or fully by their parents
-Children may be employed if their parents are acting as direct supervisors of the employment.
-Children above age 14 may take part in non-hazardous, casual employment as long as it does not endanger their safety, well-being, or health. This employment must often be approved by the child’s parent or guardian.

In addition to these laws restricting who may work, there are a number of minor employment laws throughout the United States that dictate what hours a child may work.